ralph waldo emerson essay compensation - 1841

no tax on the knowledge that the compensation exists and that it is not desirable to dig up treasure. That soul which within us is a sentiment, outside of us is a law. 36 On the other hand the law holds with equal sureness for all right action. 9, the same dualism underlies the nature and condition of man. Always it would seem there is this vindictive circumstance stealing in at unawares even into the wild poesy in which the human fancy attempted to make bold holiday and to shake itself free of the old laws, this back-stroke, this kick of the gun, certifying. 41 Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances. Things refuse to be mismanaged long. If he escapes them in one part they attack him in another more vital part. That obscene bird is not there for nothing. Every occupation, trade, art, transaction, is a compend of the world and a correlative of every other.



ralph waldo emerson essay compensation - 1841

Emerson essay ralph waldo.
From Essays : First Series (1841).
Ralph Waldo Emerson, American essayist, poet, and philosopher.
Essays : First Series as corrected and published in 1847.
First published as Essays, 1841.

1, i was lately confirmed in these desires by hearing a sermon at church. We do not see that they only go out that archangels may come. It permits or constrains the formation of new acquaintances and the reception of new influences that prove of the first importance to the next years; and the man or woman who would have remained a sunny garden-flower, with no room for its roots and too. We cannot again find aught so dear, so sweet, so graceful. The man is all. It persecutes a principle; it would whip a right; it would tar and feather justice, by inflicting fire and outrage upon the houses and persons of those who have these. This world is so busy and no one would find time to look at sorrow. Almost he shuns their eye; he fears they will upbraid God. Whilst I stand in simple relations to my fellow-man, I have no displeasure in meeting him. Every thing is made of one hidden stuff; as the naturalist sees one type under every metamorphosis, and regards a horse as a running man, a fish as a swimming man, a bird as a flying man, a tree as a rooted man. Under the primeval despots of Egypt, history honestly confesses that man must have been as free as culture could make him. Aurora forgot to ask youth for her lover, and though so Tithonus is immortal, he is old.